September 26, 2014

125: You’re Being Manipulated

I rant about Ello, the new social network sensation of the moment, how it doesn’t differ from any other platform that’s run as a viable business, why those who prefer “echo chambers” are the primary folks flocking to it, and how having a vague, dictatorial, agenda-driven view of speech actually hurts its ultimate (worthy) cause.

Broadening it out, I get into a lengthly diatribe about the detrimental effects of socio-political narratives, how it causes people to view objectivity as dissent, why the media perpetuates the notion that there are distinctly good and evil “camps” or “sides” to an issue, and how it’s inherently human to be nuanced in beliefs, undecided and amenable to change.

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September 21, 2014

124: Robotic Finger Extensions

I rant about my love/hate relationship with the iPhone 6 Plus, why it’s most definitely not a one-handed device, how app developers have been ill-prepared to support a screen this size, and that much of the user experience feels as if Apple indeed made a concession in producing a 5.5″ phone.

In addition, I laud Paypal’s attempt at exploiting the iCloud celebrity photo leaks, explain the simple reason why Microsoft acquired Minecraft, how the narcissistic traits in venture capitalists perpetuate the amount of wasteful money spent by startups, and why a phone-sized piece of plastic is no cure for digital addiction.

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September 12, 2014

123: Get Bigger Pants

I rant about this week’s Apple product announcements, the narcissistic nature of those who pre-order iPhones in the dead of night, how the tech community scoffs at “phablets” while most people want and love bigger phones, why Apple Pay will come the closest to gaining mainstream retail adoption (yet still not make it), and how the Apple Watch absolutely fulfills the definition of vaporware.

In addition, I explain why monetary interests rendered ‘Internet Slowdown Day’ as simply an act of corporate slacktivism, how insensitive brand tweets on 9/11 have just solely become fodder for false outrage through lazy journalists, why Reddit’s laissez-faire stance on censorship and poor taste should be applauded rather than vilified by digital activists, and how TechCrunch Disrupt’s winner shows that startups have unbelievably become even more insular in their problem-solving.

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September 5, 2014

122: The Human Centipede Of Advertising

I rant about the recent celebrity photo hacking, why it was only the victims’ fame that brought the story to light, how the two-faced vulturous nature of the media capitalized on it while condemning those who enable this culture, and how no one ever admits the brutal truth that humans are biologically predisposed to being aroused by the nude form.

In addition, I explain the real reason why Twitter wants to algorithmically curate your timeline, how Rdio’s redesign still won’t save it from the zero-sum game of music streaming, how Yelp’s latest court victory is nothing compared to the shareholders’ wrath, how the worst Airbnb shows the inevitable flaw in the “sharing economy”, and I admonish startup founders that VCs won’t invest in anyone who can’t even string a few sentences together.

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August 29, 2014

121: Internet Outrage Is Profitable

I rant about the culture of outrage in modern society, how social media has viciously enabled rush to judgements without any care for due diligence, why the media perpetuates the cycle of outrage for the benefit of their bottom lines, and in light of the protests in Ferguson, why it’s even more important to actually take meaningful action (physically or politically) rather than just give lip service to vital issues.

In addition, I explain the dead simple reason why Amazon acquired Twitch, why Coin can’t skirt around existing regulations and still gain any type of useful adoption, how the spat between Uber & Lyft proves that neither company’s leaders are mature enough to operate a legitimate business at scale, and how a new app proves just how insular and lazy San Francisco has become.

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